Fashion
  • Text Cristian Burbano
  • 8th January 2019

Cut and craft

The last few years have been something of a whirlwind for Royal College of Art graduate Per Götesson. Born in the small, rural town of Småland, Sweden, the designer’s move to the intense hustle and bustle of London – while running his nascent eponymous brand here, of course – fed directly into his FW19 collection.

This transition from the simplicity of small-town Swedish life to the mania of London – and all the many possibilities the city has to offer – was translated across a collection that saw Götesson break out of his comfort zone via collaborations with local craftsmen: from Savile Row, Götesson expanded his knowledge of tailoring and structure; while he worked alongside experts in digital pattern-making to deconstruct and then reimagine outerwear fits – using 3-D body mapping – as something altogether more sensual and draped (see those incredible bomber jackets, for instance).

With one foot in tradition and one in today’s new digital age, Götesson was able to refine his design codes while pushing them towards technical innovation, which expanded to the catwalk itself, featuring a sort of bed on stilts, with all sorts of clothes, toys, bottles, and tat chucked on top and chains dangling below – a bit like Tracy Emin’s bed if it was to grow legs and move to Hackney Wick.

A particular standout piece was a double-breasted Prince of Wales check blazer made with buttons engraved with rope insignia taken from one of Götesson’s own tattoos, while hand-printed leopard patterns appeared across the fleece lining of denim jackets and on muffs and scarfs (a bit punk, a bit regal). The theme of travel and migration from one city to another also came to light via accessories with jewellery made from broken glass bottles produced in collaboration with designer Husam El Odeh, like those little ships in glass bottles you always see in gift shops on holiday.