Fashion
  • Text Lewis Firth
  • 19th January 2016

Club level

Marcelo Burlon began modestly selling t-shirts to supplement his self-created, club-kid subculture he had founded in Milan (spawned from his club night, ‘Pink is Punk’, and was attended by the likes of Raf Simons And Riccardo Tisci). Now look at it: the street is the meat of Burlon’s creativity, and its this sartorial sustenance that the current generation and its custom thrive off.

Patagonia – Burlon’s native country – remains to be core stimulation for the designer’s choice of leitmotif. Symbolistic in its existence, also: markers of a culture run congruent with marking Burlon’s occupiers of the club-night subculture he created, that has now transcended disco walls and gained purpose in a street setting.

Sharp, geometric shapes cover coats, shorts and jackets, which is trickled in carefully with bright-orange colourings, which becomes a key hue for the palette. But, for a second, look past the threads and straight at the models: white, black, old, young, white-haired, shaven, dreadlocks – you can’t do street without casting what you see on the street. It doesn’t work. But Burlon nailed it comprehensively in both respects of clothes and casting. Constructions for the garms were unmethodical – oversized ponchos draped over shoulders, wet-look leather trousers, hiker boots and cut-up denim – that managed to give a governing vibe of streetwear realness.